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#ixlab Notes

#ixlab's ECA Instructional Communication Division Top Paper: "As Good as Your Word"

Posted on March 21st, 2017 by Joseph

Next week, many of the #ixlab researchers will be heading to Boston, MA for the 2017 Eastern Communication Association convention.

Of many papers being presented (look here for a full list), we wanted to provide a preview of one that will be presented on the top papers panel for the Instructional Communication division, “As good as your word”: Face-threat mitigation and the use of instructor pictures on students’ perceptions of digital instructor feedback (Clark-Gordon, Watts, Bowman, & Banks). If you plan to be at the ECA convention, you can see Catie Clark-Gordon present the paper on Saturday, April 1st, from 11 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. in room Alcott B.

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#ixlab at the 108th Annual Eastern Communication Association Convention

Posted on March 18th, 2017 by Joseph

WVU COMM Interaction Lab (#ixlab) researchers are excited to share our research at the 108th Annual Eastern Communication Association Convention in Boston, March 29th – April 2nd. If you are attending the conference, we hope to see you there! Below, you’ll find all of our presentations by day. Unless otherwise indicated, all presenters, authors, and co-authors below are currently affiliated with the #ixlab at West Virginia University.

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Diversion Drives and Superlative Soldiers: Gaming as Coping Practice among Military Personnel and Veterans

Posted on January 11th, 2017 by Joseph

In the newest issue of Game Studies, Banks and Cole (2017) looked at how US military and veteran gamers use digital games to cope with service-related challenges.

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A Preliminary Study of Racialized Brawn and Brain Framing Effects

Posted on December 20th, 2016 by Joseph

One of the very first studies undertaken by the #ixlab has recently been published in Communication Research Reports! Cranmer, Bowman, and Goldman (2016) looked at how athlete race and news articles framing athletes as either “brain” or “brawn” influences audiences’ perceptions of athletes’ athletic and mental abilities.

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#ixlab's NCA Game Studies Division Top Paper: A Bard in the Hand

Posted on November 6th, 2016 by Joseph

With the National Communication Association 102nd Annual Convention on the horizon, we wanted to do a more detailed preview of some #ixlab research that will be presented in Philadelphia in November. You can see a preview of all of our presentations at the conference here.

We are honored to have received a Game Studies Division Top Paper Award for A Bard in the Hand: The Role of Materiality in Player-Character Relationships (Banks, Bowman, & Wasserman, 2016). If you are attending NCA, come see Jaime Banks present A Bard in the Hand during the Social Motivations and Effects of Video Game Play session on Saturday, 11/2, 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm in Room 670.

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#ixlab at the National Communication Association 102nd Annual Convention

Posted on November 3rd, 2016 by Joseph

WVU COMM Interaction Lab (#ixlab) researchers are excited to share our research at the National Communication Association 102nd Annual Convention in Philadelphia, November 9th – 13th. If you are attending the conference, we hope to see you there! Below, you’ll find all of our presentations by day. Unless otherwise indicated, all presenters, authors, and co-authors below are currently affiliated with the #ixlab at West Virginia University.

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Graduate Student Notes: The Future of CMC

Posted on October 30th, 2016 by Nicholas

To explore the future of computer mediated communication, three questions should be considered: What is new media? What has it done to our communication? And what is the future of computer mediated communication? In the post-industrial society, face to face communication is heavily supplemented by computer mediated communication, providing numerous affordances that create a sense of synchronous contact, therefore drawing individuals closer in connection despite geographical distances. The future of computer mediated communication must also be considered through different philosophical lenses, such as transhumanism, progressionism, and rational capitulationism.   

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Graduate Student Notes: Cyborgs and CMC

Posted on October 23rd, 2016 by Devon

People now interact with humanoids and robots more than ever before. While increased embodiment can lead to a sense of presence, it can also violate expectations, causing apprehension. Research examining human-humanoid communication is becoming more common, and implicit reflections on human communication are masked within their findings.

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Graduate Student Notes: The Dark Side of CMC

Posted on October 16th, 2016 by Nicholas

Abstract: Much of the computer-mediated communication (CMC) literature pays particular attention to the positive aspects of CMC; however, as scholars we recognize that a dark side exists. This week we were able to explore the dark side of CMC and understand the unique ways it fosters the expression of deviance. We drew many parallels to the theories and constructs we’ve already covered like the social identity model of deindividuation effects (SIDE), presence, and the hyperpersonal model, and we used them to gain a better understanding of how people act on their deviant dispositions online.

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Graduate Student Notes: CMC and Social Relations

Posted on October 2nd, 2016 by Joseph

Abstract: The affordances of computer-mediated communication (CMC), social media, and social networking sites allow individuals to maintain large networks. These large networks of weak ties create opportunities for bridging social capital processes. This post elaborates on the affordances of CMC, how these affordances impact relational maintenance and social networks, the nature of social capital, and the interrelation between online and offline social networks. We conclude with a number of related questions.

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Seelio: Sharing Student Work

Students enrolled in COMM courses are asked to study the theory and process of human communication so that they can apply this knowledge to understanding real-world issues. As part of this process, COMM students have adopted the Seelio platform – a social media platform that allows students to create an online portfolio of their coursework that is easily accessible to the public. Sharing these portfolios shows the importance of the COMM degree while also giving prospective employees a clear, accurate look at the academic work our students are doing.

Seelio Student Coursework Showcase

Academic Advising

Our advisors are available during the summer, fall and spring semesters during office hours. Check 108 Armstrong Hall, call 304-293-3905, or e-mail an advisor to check office hours for the semester (see below for contact information).

The COMM academic advisors are:

Nikki Loy – nikki.loy@mail.wvu.edu
Dr. John Shibley – jshibley@wvu.edu
Mary Donato – mdonato4@mix.wvu.edu

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Request a Mountaineer Intern

Professional Field Experience (PFE) is a key element in the undergraduate COMM curriculum that allows students to gain experience in applying their classroom knowledge to a variety of corporate and organizational environments. Organizations looking for students with an in-depth understanding of communication areas that include (but are not limited to) communication theory, data analysis, health communication, interpersonal communication, organizational communication, and social media/communication technology now have the opportunity to request an intern from the Department of Communication Studies at WVU. Use the form below to read up on our PFE program, and to request a Mountaineer intern today.

Organization Intern Application