#ixlab Notes

#ixlab at the 2017 Association of Internet Researchers (AoiR) Conference

Several West Virginia University Interaction Lab researchers will be presenting at AoIR 2017 in Tartu, Estonia. If you are in attendance, we hope that you will attend WVU #ixlab researchers' presentations and panels! Details—including location, time, and abstracts—are included in this post.

2017 upgrades to #ixlab research lab

2017 has seen a lot of exciting upgrades to our research capabilities in the #ixlab! We’ve expanded our research spaces to two new rooms, upgraded our recording and physiological measurement equipment, and acquired some new analysis tools.

#ixlab at the 108th Annual Eastern Communication Association Convention

WVU COMM Interaction Lab (#ixlab) researchers are excited to share our research at the 108th Annual Eastern Communication Association Convention in Boston, March 29th – April 2nd. If you are attending the conference, we hope to see you there! Below, you’ll find all of our presentations by day. Unless otherwise indicated, all presenters, authors, and co-authors below are currently affiliated with the #ixlab at West Virginia University.

#ixlab's ECA Instructional Communication Division Top Paper: "As Good as Your Word"

Next week, many of the #ixlab researchers will be heading to Boston, MA for the 2017 Eastern Communication Association convention.

#ixlab at the West Virginia University 1st Annual Undergraduate Spring Symposium

Every year, a number of Undergraduate Research Assistants collaborate on faculty and graduate student research projects in the WVU COMM Interaction Lab (#ixlab). Emily Blake Louk, Senior Communication Studies major and one of our Undergraduate Research Assistants, will be presenting her year-long work on Analyzing Written Descriptions to Measure Learning from Games at WVU’s 1st Annual Undergraduate Spring Symposium. Come visit poster 92 on Saturday, 4/8/2017, 1 – 3 pm in the Mountainlair Ballrooms to learn more!

Diversion Drives and Superlative Soldiers: Gaming as Coping Practice among Military Personnel and Veterans

In the newest issue of Game Studies, Banks and Cole (2017) looked at how US military and veteran gamers use digital games to cope with service-related challenges.

Archive: #ixlab's NCA Game Studies Division Top Paper: A Bard in the Hand

With the National Communication Association 102nd Annual Convention on the horizon, we wanted to do a more detailed preview of some #ixlab research that will be presented in Philadelphia in November.

Archive: #ixlab at the National Communication Association 102nd Annual Convention

WVU COMM Interaction Lab (#ixlab) researchers are excited to share our research at the National Communication Association 102nd Annual Convention in Philadelphia, November 9th – 13th. If you are attending the conference, we hope to see you there! Below, you’ll find all of our presentations by day. Unless otherwise indicated, all presenters, authors, and co-authors below are currently affiliated with the #ixlab at West Virginia University.

Archive: Graduate Student Notes: The Future of CMC

To explore the future of computer mediated communication, three questions should be considered: What is new media? What has it done to our communication? And what is the future of computer mediated communication? In the post-industrial society, face to face communication is heavily supplemented by computer mediated communication, providing numerous affordances that create a sense of synchronous contact, therefore drawing individuals closer in connection despite geographical distances. The future of computer mediated communication must also be considered through different philosophical lenses, such as transhumanism, progressionism, and rational capitulationism.

Archive: Graduate Student Notes: Cyborgs and CMC

People now interact with humanoids and robots more than ever before. While increased embodiment can lead to a sense of presence, it can also violate expectations, causing apprehension. Research examining human-humanoid communication is becoming more common, and implicit reflections on human communication are masked within their findings.